Quilt Show Finale

Considering there were over 300 quilts in the show, I have very few photos.  Sometimes I am so into looking I don’t think of pulling out the camera.

First “two” (you can see one is a group) Japanese influenced quilts by Helene Knotts.

3 Japanese Postcards

Japanese Postcards

Helene said the “postcards” were inspired by 19 Century Japanese nature prints; from them she made a pattern series.  Some of the scenes are of real places and others imaginary. Next a sampler inspired by  Japanese indigo quilts.

3 Sekura

Sekura, Helene Knotts

And a detail

3 Sekura detail

And for more applique:

3 Streams of Life

Streams of Life, Yuki Suglyama

This one got a first place in hand quilting; here is a closer view:

3 Streams of life-detail

The description mentioned that fabrics are from kimonos.  Delicate applique is hard enough, but add in the slippery nature of silk? Impressive.

Another postcard inspired quilt.

3 Greetings from Oregon

Greetings From Oregon, Carrie Perkins

This brought back memories of my childhood travels with family and the postcards we bought and sent. Its award was for art quilt: pictorial. The “treasure hunt clue” refers to a gimmick to keep younger viewer interested. They get a paper listing  items to find among the quilts and a small prize for finding them.

Next a member donated award: this one for curved piecing. Members (for a small fee) could invent an award, and then they got to choose the quilt that won it. There are plenty of curves to qualify this one.

3 A Rose Grows in Portland

A Rose Grows in the City, Michele Nichols

Her description mentions paint drops, graffiti, a chain link fence and a red rose.Its second place ribbon is for modern quilt.

The next one is named Ruthie’s Quilt.

3 Ruthis's quilt

Ruthie’s Quilt, Nancy Neff

Nancy made this one as a block of the month–lots more than 12 blocks here! I’m drawn to the long narrow points. Wonder if I’ll ever manage to make blocks like that . . .

3 Believe in yourself

Believe in Yourself–Chase Your Dreams, Nancy Tubbs

Nancy challenged herself to quilt a different design in each arc. And for her effort she got a first in domestic machine quilting.

3 Believe-detail

These colors caught my eye. And the flying geese. And the setting.

3 Desert Beauty

Desert Beauty, Karen Nelson

It strikes me as a modern quilt made from traditional blocks. There is no doubt that the next one is modern.

3 Abloom

Abloom, Camille Ainsworth

And the ribbon is for the modern category.

One more modern quilt:

3 Intersections

Intersection, Linda Becker

The quilt, a wedding present, captures the intersection of personalities in the intersecting design. The colors are the wedding colors.

I think I have matched titles and photos and ribbon categories. Once again, if you spot a misattribution, do comment.

Until the next show . . .

 

 

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Quilt Show–Second Installment

I’ve been slow; it is more tedious when the text and quilt are not together in my files. But here are a few more I have matched quilt to description. Starting with first place large quilt–pieced.

2 Turquoise to Teal

Turquoise to Teal

It is easy to see why this one got the award for piecing! And though it got second place for hand quilting, I neglected to get a detailed photo. Janis Pearson said she used 225 shades of turquoise/teal, overdying some to get the desired shade.

Here’s another with intricate piecing.

2 Journey through cosmos

Journey through the Cosmos, Betty Dodge

Can’t help but wonder why this one didn’t get a prize too–other than that there are more quilts than prizes.  I am drawn to all those narrow points.

Here is one from the Rainbow Scrap Challenge.

2 parliament

Parliament

The online challenge  has been going for several years. Each month a color is assigned and quilters make up one or more blocks with scraps of that color. Some make a quilt of each color, others, like Sally Trude, combine them.  There is a monthly linky party for people to show what they have accomplished.  I might play once I sort my scraps. Sally  created this block design herself.

The next quilt comes from a math instructor.

2 square in diamond

Rows of Squares in Diamonds

Irena Swanson sometimes tells how many pieces (964 here) and always how many seams (109 here–sometimes it is dramatically fewer). She has a website (here) and several YouTube videos instructing in her method. Here is a link to one of the videos, Half Square Triangles,Part I.

I entered Dreaming of Cool, Clear, Abundant Water in Art Quilts—Abstract and got a third place this year. (More were entered, so more competition.) Here are the first and second.

2 1st and 2nd art

First place went to Anton Haas, Jr. for Polygon Paradise. I think the second place piece is Rain in the Glen by Evelyn Eason. (My photo of the description has no  bit of quilt or mention of category to go by–if you know that I am right or wrong, please comment.)

And you have seen mine before, but here it is hanging straight.

2 Dreaming of ..

Here is an impressive 3D effect.

2 Where do we go from here

Where Do We Go from Here, Gail Planck

Gail says it has 2277 triangle pieces! Here is a detail

2 Where go-detail

The ribbon is for Kazumi Peterson’s long arm quilting.

This is only a sample of the 300+ quilts in the show–as you can see, it was a very good show.

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Contradance Finished

From idea to finished product in one day (however, the HSTs were premade). A record.  (I should mention that it is only 8-inches square.)

Back when I was organizing scraps (somewhat) I gathered all my bonus triangles and HSTs together.  This is just one bagful:

a trimmings

“Bonus” means they come from rectangle pieces stitched together on the diagonal to make blocks like the Flying Geese bock. Once cut off I keep them, stitch them as leaders-enders, then when the fancy strikes move them along. These are all stitched; some need to be pressed, some are pressed already. All need to be trimmed.

The motivation this time came when our guild was demonstrating quilting at the Gathering of the Guilds.  I figured I could get a fair amount of trimming completed in a couple hours there. And I did.

One batch was a group of HSTs that had gotten separated from the original batch. That batch has long been a quilt (here).  I had enough to make four blocks and I had yet to make a little quilt for the small quilt raffle at the guild show. So I started arranging.

a arrangement

I could have made five of that corner block, but it didn’t make a logical center for a 9-patch, so I substituted the pinwheel and the few extras will go with other random left overs. And I did fix the pinwheel before I started to sew. You can see the resemblance to the Bear Paw, though the larger HSTs would have to be squares and the pinwheel a smaller square for it to really be a Bear Paw.  Someday I’ll browse to see if such a block already is identified in Barbara Brackman’s encyclopedia.

So I started in the morning and finished in the early afternoon. Actually I was surprised it took so long. And here is the finish:

a Contradance

Binding took forever because there were mostly corners. None of those long seams to make time on!

For once a Scrap Happy quilt that has scraps even for the background and backing and binding. I usually fudge on at least one of those items. Visit Kate’s Tall Tales from Chiconia to see more scrappy posts. (I’ll update with specific link later.)

There were 46-47 quilts in the small quilt raffle.  I haven’t gotten any phone calls, so apparently I didn’t win any that I put chances on.

ETA: Today (5/14/18) at guild meeting they announced the small quilt raffle brought in a little over $600.00.

 

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Quilt Show–First Installment

A new challenge.  I purposely take photos of the labels before the quilt so I can remember title and maker. Usually it works well.  This time, doing nothing differently than usual, I downloaded photos and all the labels grouped first and then the quilts–and those not in the order they were taken. There goes my system. So this installment will show you the ones I can reunite enough to attribute! I’ll work harder and do a post with the rest later.

ETA: I did do one thing differently. I selected all (because I wanted to deselect two–which I couldn’t). Doesn’t make sense, but maybe that is what shuffled them????

A wall of quilts greeted me as I looked right

1 wall of quilts

A small group had decided to each make the same pattern. They said that a couple fabrics ran through the series. I could not identify which it was, but it was fun to see the color variations.

And though you have seen my Water is Life quilt before, here it is hanging for a better view than draped on the couch.

1 water is life show

I didn’t have time to hang around to see if anyone stopped long enough to find the word ‘LIFE,’ but in the short time I watched, people passed by quickly. (History of the quilt in reverse here )

Next a quilt I recognized by Barbara Stanbro.

1 snakes

Snips and Snails

I’d planned to look for her quilt, but she didn’t remember which category she had put it in. Nor did I remember which quilt she had entered. So I was tickled to recognize it from having watched it grow on her Cat Patches blog. (Her blog here) And more tickled to see it had a second place ribbon for the category of Art Quilt Pictorial. I knew from her blog that she had designed it from a photograph of her brother in a class with Ruth McDowell.

Another quilt I recognized from watching it progress at a guild retreat is Tam Gardner’s Blue Stars with Orange.

1 blue star with orange

After making the blue star quilt, she decided it needed orange. What a great result!

And for some more orange, the first-place miniature quilt.

1 orange feather

Orange Feathers, Barbara Schulenberg

You are wondering how small those triangles, aren’t you? Here is my finger for perspective.

1 orange feather finger

On the subject of color, here is the winner of the In Memory of Fran: Best Use of Lime Green award, given to a 3-D quilt. The back story of the award: Fran attended retreats regularly and was quite a jokester. One day she mentioned not liking lime green, so fellow retreat goers all started to sew with lime green. And she was awarded a box of lime green fabric at the final awards section of the retreat. After making a quilt with the pieces, she said she was beginning to like lime green.  She is greatly missed.

1 elements

Though they doesn’t show as lime green, the leaves at the top are.  And the 3-D shows much better in the detail views.

Here are three of the ancient four elements: air, fire, and water.  Alas, earth is missing, though I was sure I had taken its photo.  Later I remembered that my batteries had died on the earth photo. So after changing batteries, I must have forgotten to go back. And the label for this one is also missing, though I was sure I had seen it earlier. I did see another label that mentions 3D, so maybe I confused them. So I don’t remember the exact title or the maker. If you know, please put information in the comments!

I’ll share some more from the show after I’ve matched text and quilt photos.

Edited to solve the mystery of the missing photos.

 

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Water is Life:A Tribute to the Standing Rock Water Protectors

Back in February I rushed to finish the top (post here), then set it aside because there was no rush.  Now rush is approaching as the show set up is May 10.  And it is finished.

Still showing quilts on my sofa until I find a willing quilt holder. Wondered if pillows under the quilt would improve the photo.

Life-whole-bumpy

Don’t think it did.  Back to the old way.

Life-whole-finished

ETA link to the flat view hanging at the show. 5/22/18. And while I’m at it, I’ll link to Clever Chameleon’s Tuesday Colour Linky Party.

For the “sky” I was debating whether to do elongated meander as I ended up doing or some windy, cloudy swirls. I chose the meander because I didn’t want to detract from the bubbles.  I’m not sure it was the best decision. It does look a little better now that the quilt is bound, though.

The other decision was whether to quilt concentric circles as if the letters were not there. I had wanted the letters to be obscure, something to be found on closer inspection. I decided they were hard enough to see, so I quilted around them. The problem with a design detail for closer inspection is that there has to be something to invite that inspection. I’m not sure this quilt has that. I’ll try to watch viewers a bit, if I can be subtle.

Here are some views of the quilting.

Life quilting left bottom

I used “pebbles” to make “bubbles.”  I used concentric circles in the big circle; I’d usually do concentric circles with the walking foot, but the position was such that turning would have been too much wrestling, so I tried free motion.  Maybe I need to learn ruler work. Wonder if there is a ruler foot that fits my Featherweight? (Don’t worry, I won’t mention flaws to people viewing, but my blog is for the good, the bad and the ugly and reflections thereon.) The circles also look smoother from a distance and a washing will do more smoothing yet.

Life quiting right bottom

I think the letters are clear, but not too clear.  And the quilted words:Life-quilting close up

While realism wasn’t part of the plan, I though a nod to perspective was in order, so I used  the differing sizes of the phrase to suggest distance. Maybe it does, maybe it doesn’t.

I’ll like to Connie’s Freemotion by the River and to the Friday finish linkies if I remember (buttons in sidebar).

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Finished and Named: Loop d’ Loop

This quilt from Latifah Saafir’s workshop is the second of three for the upcoming guild show. The quilting continued well; the binding took longer than planned.  I was halfway around the quilt on the first seam when I realized I was sewing binding to the front instead of the back. I pondered ripping it out, but decided that would take as long as hand sewing the second seam.  I’ve made that mistake before, but I usually catch it a couple inches in.

I haven’t sewn the hanging sleeve yet because I’ve not decided which side is top.

At first I thought this way

Loop 1

I thought I wanted those bendy long “stems” on the bottom, reaching up like real plants do..

But now I’m leaning to this one.

Loop 2

It seems more stable and the long stem swoops move the eye around more than the other way. But just for the sake of completeness, here are views 3 and 4.

 

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Or maybe it doesn’t matter at all. After the guild quilt show it will become a lap quilt for someone in a nursing home.

The other design decision was color of binding.  I’d considered green as well as yellow.  Yellow won because some of the loops are so close to the edge that the green crowded them.  The quilt’s history starts here ( reverse order) where other design decisions were discussed.

It’s not Friday but “Finished or Not Friday” is still open, so I’ll link. (Button in sidebar for your convenience. Go look.)

On to quilt number 3. A little over a week is plenty of time.

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Half the Battle is Deciding

This top has been finished for quite a while. Once set aside, it seems a project gets further and further out of mind.

Loop 'd Loop top

It is the project from Latifah Saffir’s workshop, Designing with Bias, that I attended last summer.  (Previous posts here, here, here, and here.)

When I would get it out, I’d ponder quilting and then put it away again.  Gradually I got the ideas for the wishbone on the sashing and the various motifs between the strips of bias. But what to do with the loop section remained elusive.  The shapes of the background did not invite various motifs as did the strips.  And besides it seemed that variety might distract from the loops themselves.

I considered echoing, but that too seemed daunting and not necessarily effective. Of course once I got the winning idea, I wondered why it had taken so long. It seemed so obvious. And doable.

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At first I balked at crossing all those bias lines, then realized I could do the tight-stitch knotting up to the bias, advance past the bias, then make a couple more tight stitches to anchor the thread and continue the lines, trimming later. Two blocks finished, two to go.

Linking with Connie’s Free Motion by the River. Click and see what others have been doing.

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