Mental and Visual Planning

I have thought on the various options I left off with and finally decided to cut strips to see how the veins would look.  “Make visual decisions visually” is advice I’d gotten somewhere; perhaps in the Masterclass with Elizabeth Barton a couple years ago. In the Masterclass, I’d been faulted for laying out strips including the seam allowance.  Trim or press it; it’s only fabric . . . But pressing seam allowances on narrow strips seemed too much handling. And of course I was always sure I’d end up just that one or two inches short. So on to viewing the plan with strips.

attempt 1

Besides trying strips in the correct size, I auditioned two possible fabrics for the possible varying of the background. I did not like the three colors of veins nearly as well IRL as in my head. And my first thought for the background variation was to add some color to the rather bland winter block. Not thrilled with that either. Moving on

attempt 2

This one seemed too dark.

attempt 3

I tried the varied background in different places.  The bottom fabric drew too much attention to itself for a background. It would maybe have worked had I stayed with Plan A to replicate the leaf segment, more or less.

To view more than one segment of the less bright color I needed to cut fabric. Since I had only a fat quarter, I had to be sure I had enough. So I went ahead and drew the “map” of the plan and the tissue paper templates. (Yes, I decided on templates instead of improv, mostly because I had to end up with a specific size.) There was enough fabric, so I laid it out.

attempt 4

And I switched out a couple leaf veins to a lighter orange and liked it. But wondered if I needed more of the alternate background. So tried one more layout.

attempt 5

You may have noticed that the spring tree doesn’t have as stable a position as the others. I’ll need to decide soon.  I like the idea of a narrow piece of the second background, maybe down the whole right of the main vein. but I don;t like the two background colors together without the vein between, and that is not a place to put a vein. I’ll probably go with the fourth layout.

I realized that I don’t have a clear focus area.  Not sure what, if anything, to do about it.

Come Friday, I’ll link with Nina Marie’s Off the Wall Fridays (link in sidebar). You might enjoy a visit, check it out.

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14 Comments

Filed under design, quilting

14 responses to “Mental and Visual Planning

  1. I like the fourth one best. It feels balanced, it has visual interest. Would you consider another vein at bottom left?

  2. I’m with Kate, I like the 4th layout best. Looking forward to seeing where you go next.

  3. I actually liked the first layout, but the 4th layout is my 2nd choice. And I like Kate’s idea of the additional ‘vein’. I really like seeing how your ideas evolve!

  4. You took a masterclass with Elizabeth Barton? Wow! I have a couple of her books. That is a wonderful quilt you are working on I like the alternate veins it adds interest!

  5. Betty Colburn

    Two and four are my choices. I’d also like to see an additional branch angled downward from the lowest branch on the right side. Thank you for putting your work out for all of us to contemplate.

  6. dezertsuz

    I like it with the two orange triangles in the background, and the colors of strips at the very top. I think I’d like the fall block where the spring is. It feels a little heavy with fall at the bottom and all the light at the top. Unless that’s what you wanted it to do. =)

  7. Gwyned

    It is always fascinating to see how just a change here or there can make a big difference. Thank you for sharing your thought process. I too, felt #4 had enough variety for interesting, but nothing to detract from the overall image.

  8. Well, gee, at least you’re planning! Sometimes I just start!

  9. nnkpitts

    Think you are over-thinking the whole thing, just go with what you are most comfortable with and it will be right.

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